University of Connecticut University of UC Title Fallback Connecticut

How Robots Can Help Children with Autism Learn and Communicate

By: Tom Breen & Bret Eckhardt

UConn researcher Tim Gifford is studying how robots can help children with autism learn and communicate. The research is currently being conducted with students in kindergarten through fifth grade at Whiting Lane Elementary School in West Hartford, CT. To learn more about the robot project, visit: https://s.uconn.edu/robotshelp/a>

UConn researcher Tim Gifford is studying how robots can help children with autism learn and communicate. The research is currently being conducted with students in kindergarten through fifth grade at Whiting Lane Elementary School in West Hartford, CT. To learn more about the robot project, visit: http://s.uconn.edu/robotshelp

The young boy, Jack, shyly approaches his friend in a classroom at Whiting Lane Elementary School. This is the last time they’ll see each other, and Jack has a gift for his playmate: a picture of the two of them together, and the words, “I’ll miss you.”

A common enough scene, except the “you” in this case is a humanoid robot programmed by researchers affiliated with the University of Connecticut and Movia Robotics to help children with learning delays like those on the autism spectrum improve their social and communication skills.

“Hi, Jack,” the robot chirps in greeting, before he and the student get into a sequence of activities designed to help Jack not just in the classroom, but in his daily life.

Timothy Gifford – who is the CEO of Movia Robotics as well as the director of the Advanced Interactive Technology Center at UConn’s Center for Health, Intervention, and Prevention (CHIP) – sees the work as having potential to cross over into the marketplace.

“That’s really the goal: to take this out of the lab and into the classroom,” he says. “One of the reasons we wanted to make this a commercially available product is to get it into the hands of as many schools and students as possible.”

That’s going to take some time, and the project is still in development, as Gifford and his team learn what works, and what a high-tech product like a robot needs to have in order to function in the world of elementary school kids and daily use.

At his lab at the Connecticut Science Center, where he’s currently scientist-in-residence, Gifford works with programmers who are developing the sequences the two-foot-tall robots, which are made by a French company called Aldebaran Robotics, use in their interactions with students.

While the robot engages the students one-on-one, someone else – right now a researcher, but hopefully soon a teacher or teacher’s aide – guides the interaction from a laptop computer. The six sequences are flexible enough to be effective when working with children with different levels of ability: one child delightedly bangs on a drum along with the robot, while another runs through more complex verbal exercises designed to improve his ability to communicate with peers.

Read more at UConn Today.

 


More News Stories

Upcoming Events