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Cracking Down on Cyber Crime

He called himself Master Splyntr, one of the most respected members of a large group of cyber criminals who bought and sold stolen financial information such as credit card data and user names and passwords.

Jim Trainor ’93 MPA, deputy assistant director, FBI Cyber Division, in front of the J. Edgar Hoover FBI Building in Washington, D.C. (Photo courtesy of the FBI)

Jim Trainor ’93 MPA, deputy assistant director, FBI Cyber Division, in front of the J. Edgar Hoover FBI Building in Washington, D.C. (Photo courtesy of the FBI)

What the group did not know was that Master Splyntr was an undercover FBI agent who had infiltrated their website posing as a cyber crook. His work helped the FBI take down a cyber operation that resulted in 56 arrests worldwide and prevented $70 million in potential losses.

This scenario might have come from the pages of a Tom Clancy novel, but it is actually a real-life example of the high-tech operations that cross the desk of Jim Trainor ’93 MPA, deputy assistant director of the Cyber Division of the FBI. The Cyber Division leads the national effort to investigate high-tech crimes – such as cyber-based terrorism, espionage, computer intrusions, identity theft, and major cyber fraud – and pursue cyber-crime fugitives.

Trainor’s FBI work is as intriguing as it is demanding. “As technology changes, criminal actions change,” he notes. “We investigate criminal and national security cyber threats. Our work is global in scale, fast-moving, and requires a partnership with federal, state, and local agencies as well as the private sector. It involves extensive sharing of information to protect the country.”

Read the full story at UConn Today.

By: Lisa Catanese ’82 (CLAS) & Julia Chianelli ’85, ’90 (CLAS)


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