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Navy Veteran Navigating New Strategies in Military Policy

 

From left, Tiffany Cousins ’14, Kamilla Dynia ’14, Kevin Evringham, graduate teaching assistant for Professor John Jolly-Ballantine, and Victoria Chilinski ’16, look over water samples during an outdoor geography class near Mirror Lake. (Sean Flynn/UConn Photo)

Kevin Evringham, center, as a teaching assistant with students in a geography class. (Sean Flynn/UConn Photo)

Not everyone has the mind for evaluating military strategy – least of all your typical 8-year-old. But Kevin Evringham ’10 (CLAS), ’12 MA recalls standing as a child alongside his father and staring out across the geography of a Civil War battlefield in Fredericksburg, Va., knowing where the Union general had gone wrong and why the battle had ended in disaster for his soldiers.

During his youth, Evringham visited every Civil War battlefield on the East Coast with his family. With his mother having served in the Marine Corps, and his grandfather and great-grandfather in the Navy, Evringham had a family tree rooted in a tradition of military service. So it came as no surprise to his parents when Evringham, still a junior in high school, signed up to join the Navy immediately upon graduation. “Ever since I was a kid, I wanted to go into the military,” he says. “That was never a question.”

Evringham spent three years working as a cryptographer in the Navy before he left the service just a few months before 9/11, and subsequently bounced around for the next few years in a dozen unsatisfying jobs in retail, security, and life insurance sales. With hopes of eventually completing an undergraduate degree, he considered a number of different career paths, taking a few classes at a community college in his home state of Florida. But returning in one form or another to his lifelong interest in the military held strong.

“If you’re not in the military, what can you do with the military?” Evringham asked himself. He realized that working in military policy was his ideal. “I thought of the job I would want to do in a perfect world, and that would be national security advisor. Who was a national security advisor? Condoleeza Rice. So I looked her up and what her education was. All of her background is essentially international relations.”

Read more at UConn Today

By: Stefanie Dion Jones


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