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Taking ‘Adventure Botany’ on the Road

Whether you await the arrival of “Shark Week” with feverish enthusiasm each year or simply look forward to greeting your Labradoodle when you return home at day’s end, it’s likely you subscribe to Christopher Martine ’06 Ph.D.’s belief that animals are, indeed, awesome.

Christopher Martine ’06 Ph.D., left, and Krissa Skogen ’08 Ph.D. collect a sample of pollen from the proboscis of a nocturnal hawkmoth at White Sands National Monument in New Mexico, while filming the latest episode of Martine’s web series, “Plants Are Cool, Too!” Both are alumni of UConn’s ecology and evolutionary biology graduate program. (Photo by Patrick Alexander)

Christopher Martine ’06 Ph.D., left, and Krissa Skogen ’08 Ph.D. collect a sample of pollen from the proboscis of a nocturnal hawkmoth at White Sands National Monument in New Mexico, while filming the latest episode of Martine’s web series, “Plants Are Cool, Too!” Both are alumni of UConn’s ecology and evolutionary biology graduate program. (Photo by Patrick Alexander)

But this UConn alum is out to prove to you that, in fact, plants are very cool, too.

Traveling to deserts, swamps, and mountain ranges across the country with a film crew in tow, Martine is on a mission to seek out unusual and extraordinary stories about the plant world and then to deliver them to audiences far and wide via his own YouTube web series – aptly titled “Plants Are Cool, Too!”

“There is all this dynamic visual content out there for young people to watch,” says Martine, creator, co-producer, and host for “Plants Are Cool, Too!” as well as associate professor of plant genetics and research at Bucknell University. “There’s ‘Shark Week’ and all these other animal shows, and it’s a great way for kids to learn about nature. I thought, ‘Well, what do people have for plants?’ There are a lot of gardening shows; no kid is going to watch a gardening show. So the idea here was to generate cool content related to botany, and hope that young people had something they could actually find and watch if they were willing to learn about plants.”

Read more at UConn Today

By Stefanie Dion Jones


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